Why We Don’t Think ‘Trash the Dress’ Is Trashy, But Très Chic

Trash the dress

We might be based in Mauritius, but we do keep our pulse on what’s the latest in the wedding photography world. It’s been around long enough to acquire mixed opinions: those for and those against trashing your wedding dress. Our most interesting findings about this trend were the interpretations of ‘trash.’ Read on to see what we mean.

Photographer Sarah GormleyP I N this to pinterest

by Photographer Sarah Gormley (‘Lady of the Lake’ inspired)

Extreme Wedding Dress Trashing Isn’t for Most

Two shoots come to mind when you mention extreme trashing. The dress-is-on-fire captured by Israeli photog Erik Simantov; the horrific drowning of a Canadian bride in a shoot that went terribly wrong. Neither of these is our cup of tea, for a very simple fact: your dress- your day- should be captured. But not at the cost of a ‘great photo.’ Not only that, it isn’t necessary. Really.

What Most Brides Mean by ‘Trashing the Dress’

 

Photo by Casa FragmaP I N this to pinterest

Photo by Casa Fragma

Would you be surprised to find out that almost 90% of brides aren’t only able to dry clean their dresses after their ‘rock the frock’ shoot, they can then choose what to do with them? The word ‘trash’ is a misnomer. The actual application is simply taking daring shots in wedding white- after the wedding. It’s a glamour spread of photos taken in a beautiful dress, with odd surroundings.

Since it’s so difficult keeping your gown pristine on your special day, you reserve a photo shoot post-wedding (or honeymoon) that can be anywhere. It’s you not looking nervous but relaxed. Just imagine being able to flaunt your dress with a fashionable flair.

Choosing Your Locale Is Important for Post Wedding Photos

Some women choose beaches with the sea foam rushing in to catch a pretty wedding dress moment; others choose industrial sites, favorite city streets or scenic hilltops (all are great for photos, but easily grimy for white satin). A few brides have even opted for dumpsites, if you can believe it.

Whatever your choice for your ‘fearless bridal’ (aka trash the dress), it’s just a photo shoot with you looking your absolute best in a scene that resembles a Vogue beauty spread. Without you worrying about staining or smudging your dress on your wedding day- it’s after the fact.

What To Do With Your Dress After It’s Been ‘Trashed?’

 

Photo by Jdurham/morguefile.comP I N this to pinterest

Photo by Jdurham/morguefile.com

A lot of brides that did their post-wedding photo shoots said they just had it dry-cleaned, and it came out perfectly. Which means you have the same options you did after your wedding day. You can keep it; modify it for another occasion; or you can donate it for a lucky bride that is in need. It’s completely up to you.

The main reason we think ‘trashing’ your wedding dress is aces: you get to be yourself, relaxed, in a place you choose without the stress of keeping things perfect. You can play in the muck, be yourself- have fantastic photos for your album- and in the end, the dress will be fine.

We can’t think of a better way to wear your dress for the second time than for additional, stylish memories. Having a few beautiful extra shots in your gown is icing on the wedding cake. Even if it’s a bit of a cheeky wink, ‘trashing’ your wedding dress.

 

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